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4th Sunday of Advent, Year A

Note: Homilies & Angelus / Regina Caeli of Pope Saint John Paul II, Pope Benedict XVI & Pope Francis I had been compiled for you after the Mass Readings below. Happy Reading!

Liturgical Colour: Purple

 

Mass Readings from ETWN.

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-341. 8-)

First Reading: Isaiah 7:10-14,

Responsorial: Psalm 24:1-6,

2nd Reading: Romans 1:1-7 &

Gospel: Matthew 1:18-24, CCTNtv, Gospel video.

 

Others:

Matthew Chapter 1 (video)

Remember Saint Joseph, Patron of the Universal Church & our reliable Guardian.

See our Saint Joseph Webpage.

See the Saint Joseph Staircase from Wikipedia.

The Staircase—Full Movie. Saint Joseph always answers our prayers. Many Thanks.

Superman & Christmas - Venerable Fulton J. Sheen

 

Give a little more than you take 

Who is this Joseph? This is the Joseph in the Book of Genesis. He is the 11th son of Jacob, see Wikipedia.

Someone said: ‘I want “a Joseph” to be my Prime Minister!’

Is he born yet? It is faster if you strive to be “a Joseph” yourself! You may never be a PM but you will definitely shine! 8-)

Are you trying to be that? We want to team up with you in business!

Listen to more: Joseph (Animation Soundtrack), Joseph (by Continental Singers)

 

1. Criminal Investigation Department, Singapore Police Force.

2. See Singapore Police Officers harassing elderly innocent Cancer Survivor here.

Please spread the News to help the innocent victims who commit no crime. Many Thanks.

Till this day, there is no apology from the Rulers and no compensation paid for damages inflicted.

 

Homilies, Angelus / Regina Caeli

 

A. Pope Saint John Paul II    

 

Angelus, 20 December 1998

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-342. 8-)

 

Angelus, 23 December 2001

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-342. 8-)

 

Angelus, 19 December 2004

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-342. 8-)

 

B. Pope Benedict XVI  

 

Angelus, 23 December 2007

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-342. 8-)

 

Angelus, 19 December 2010

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-343. 8-)

 

C. Pope Francis I  

 

Angelus, 22 December 2013

On this Fourth Sunday of Advent, the Gospel tells us about the events preceding the birth of Jesus, and the Evangelist Matthew presents them from the point of view of St Joseph, the betrothed of the Virgin Mary.

 

Joseph and Mary were dwelling in Nazareth; they were not yet living together, because they were not yet married. In the meantime, Mary, after having welcomed the Angel’s announcement, came to be with child by the power of the Holy Spirit. When Joseph realized this, he was bewildered. The Gospel does not explain what his thoughts were, but it does tell us the essential: he seeks to do the will of God and is ready for the most radical renunciation. Rather than defending himself and asserting his rights, Joseph chooses what for him is an enormous sacrifice. And the Gospel tells us: “Joseph, being a just man and unwilling to put her to shame, resolved to send her away quietly” (1:19).

 

This brief sentence reveals a true inner drama if we think about the love that Joseph had for Mary! But even in these circumstances, Joseph intends to do the will of God and decides, surely with great sorrow, to send Mary away quietly. We need to meditate on these words in order to understand the great trial that Joseph had to endure in the days preceding Jesus’ birth. It was a trial similar to the sacrifice of Abraham, when God asked him for his son Isaac (cf. Genesis 22): to give up what was most precious, the person most beloved.

 

But as in the case of Abraham, the Lord intervenes: he found the faith he was looking for and he opens up a different path, a path of love and of happiness. “Joseph,” he says, “do not fear to take Mary your wife, for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit” (Matthew 1:20).

 

This Gospel passage reveals to us the greatness of St Joseph’s heart and soul. He was following a good plan for his life, but God was reserving another plan for him, a greater mission. Joseph was a man who always listened to the voice of God, he was deeply sensitive to his secret will, he was a man attentive to the messages that came to him from the depths of his heart and from on high. He did not persist in following his own plan for his life, he did not allow bitterness to poison his soul; rather, he was ready to make himself available to the news that, in a such a bewildering way, was being presented to him. And thus, he was a good man. He did not hate, and he did not allow bitterness to poison his soul. Yet how many times does hatred, or even dislike and bitterness poison our souls! And this is harmful. Never allow it: he is an example of this. And Joseph thereby became even freer and greater. By accepting himself according to God’s design, Joseph fully finds himself, beyond himself. His freedom to renounce even what is his, the possession of his very life, and his full interior availability to the will of God challenge us and show us the way.

 

Let us make ourselves ready to celebrate Christmas by contemplating Mary and Joseph: Mary, the woman full of grace who had the courage to entrust herself totally to the Word of God; Joseph, the faithful and just man who chose to believe the Lord rather than listen to the voices of doubt and human pride. With them, let us walk together toward Bethlehem.

Pope Francis I (Angelus, 22 December 2013)

 

Angelus, 18 December 2016

The liturgy for today, the Fourth and last Sunday of Advent, is characterized by the theme of closeness, God’s closeness to humanity. The Gospel passage (cf. Matthew 1:18-24) shows us two people, the two people who, more than anyone else, were involved in this mystery of love: the Virgin Mary and her husband, Joseph. A mystery of love, the mystery of God’s closeness to humanity.

 

Mary is presented in the light of the prophet who says: “Behold, a virgin shall conceive and bear a son” (v. 23). Matthew the Evangelist recognizes that this happened in Mary, who conceived Jesus through the Holy Spirit (cf. v. 18). The Son of God “comes” into her womb in order to become man, and she welcomes him. Thus, in a unique way, God drew near to mankind, taking on flesh through a woman: God drew near to us and took on flesh through a woman. To us too, in a different way, God draws near with his grace in order to enter our life and offer us the gift of his Son. What do we do? Do we welcome him, let him draw near, or do we reject him, push him away? As Mary, freely offering herself to the Lord of history, allowed him to change the destiny of mankind, so too can we, by welcoming Jesus and seeking to follow him each day, cooperate in his salvific plan for us and for the world. Mary thus appears to us as a model to look to and upon whose support we can count in our search for God, in our closeness to God, in thus allowing God to draw close to us and in our commitment to build the culture of love.

 

The other protagonist of today’s Gospel is Saint Joseph. The Evangelist highlights that alone, Joseph cannot explain to himself the event which he sees taking place before his eyes, namely, Mary’s pregnancy. Just then, in that moment of doubt, even anguish, God approaches him — him too — through his messenger and [Joseph] is enlightened about the nature of this maternity: “the child conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit” (cf. v. 20). Thus, in facing this extraordinary event, which surely gave rise to many questions in his heart, he trusts totally in God who has drawn near to him, and after his invitation, does not repudiate his betrothed, but takes her to him and takes Mary to wife. In accepting Mary, Joseph knowingly and lovingly receives Him who has been conceived in her through the wondrous work of God, for whom nothing is impossible. Joseph, a just and humble man (cf. v. 19), teaches us to always trust in God, who draws near to us: when God approaches us, we must entrust ourselves to him. Joseph teaches us to allow ourselves to be guided by Him with willing obedience.

 

These two figures, Mary and Joseph, who were the first to welcome Jesus through faith, introduce us to the mystery of Christmas. Mary helps us to assume an attitude of openness in order to welcome the Son of God into our concrete life, in our flesh. Joseph spurs us to always seek God’s will and to follow it with full trust. Both allow God to draw near to them.

 

“‘Behold, a virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and his name shall be called Emmanuel’, which means, God-with-us” (Matthew 1:23). Thus the angel says: “the child shall be called Emmanuel, which means God-with-us”, in other words, God near to us. And to God who draws near, do I open the door — to the Lord — when I sense an interior inspiration, when I hear him ask me to do something more for others, when he calls me to pray?

 

God-with-us, God who draws near. This message of hope, which is fulfilled at Christmas, leads to fulfilment of the expectation of God in each one of us too, in all the Church, and in the many little ones whom the world scorns, but whom God also loves and to whom God draws near.

Pope Francis I (Angelus, 18 December 2016)

 

Homilies 2019 

 

Angelus, Regina Caeli 2019

 

Audiences 2019

 

Daily Blessings to You from Emmanuel Goh & Friends new!

 

Note: This webpage has many hyperlinks to the Vatican Webpage. The above extracts were compiled for your easy reading.

This Publication is aimed to encourage all of Goodwill around the World. It is not for business or profit purposes but it is our way to thank our Creator for His continuous blessings!

 

Compiled on 14 December 2019, 19:30 SGT

Last updated: 18 December 2019

 

See Christmas Mass Readings & Homilies

 

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